futurejournalismproject
futurejournalismproject:

theatlantic:

These Journalists Spent Two Years and $750,000 Covering One Story

In recent weeks, ProPublica has published a major—and scathing—investigative series on the dangers of Tylenol’s main active ingredient, acetaminophen. Two years in the making, this series shows yet again the essential role of investigative journalism in providing public information that can literally save lives. 
On the chance that the impact of the revelations has already been overtaken by other news, here again is the gist of the stories. Tylenol’s marketing has long emphasized its safety. Among the more memorable of its advertisements was that Tylenol was the pain reliever “hospitals use most” and packages asserted that the pills provided “safe, fast pain relief.” It turns out that these claims were dangerously misleading, and were known to be so by both the pharmaceutical manufacturer and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. To expand the reach of its findings to millions of radio listeners, ProPublica, brought in public radio’s This American Life as a collaborator which incisively summarized ProPublica’s evidence of the dangers of acetaminophen. “During the last decade,” the first ProPublica piece begins, “more than 1,500 Americans died after taking too much of a drug renowned for its safety.” Moreover, the series and broadcast showed that the FDA has known for decades about the scale of the problem, but has failed to fully implement a succession of recommendations and warnings. 
Read more. [Image: ProPublica/Flickr]


The cost of reporting

futurejournalismproject:

theatlantic:

These Journalists Spent Two Years and $750,000 Covering One Story

In recent weeks, ProPublica has published a major—and scathing—investigative series on the dangers of Tylenol’s main active ingredient, acetaminophen. Two years in the making, this series shows yet again the essential role of investigative journalism in providing public information that can literally save lives. 

On the chance that the impact of the revelations has already been overtaken by other news, here again is the gist of the stories. Tylenol’s marketing has long emphasized its safety. Among the more memorable of its advertisements was that Tylenol was the pain reliever “hospitals use most” and packages asserted that the pills provided “safe, fast pain relief.” It turns out that these claims were dangerously misleading, and were known to be so by both the pharmaceutical manufacturer and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. To expand the reach of its findings to millions of radio listeners, ProPublica, brought in public radio’s This American Life as a collaborator which incisively summarized ProPublica’s evidence of the dangers of acetaminophen. “During the last decade,” the first ProPublica piece begins, “more than 1,500 Americans died after taking too much of a drug renowned for its safety.” Moreover, the series and broadcast showed that the FDA has known for decades about the scale of the problem, but has failed to fully implement a succession of recommendations and warnings.

Read more. [Image: ProPublica/Flickr]

The cost of reporting

instagram

instagram:

Discovering News on Instagram

Interested to know more about how news organizations can use video? Check out some of our tips on how you can get the most out of Instagram video.

Since launching video on Instagram back in June, we’ve seen the many creative ways Instagrammers have used video to express themselves. From a hand-drawn time-lapse artist to a sci-fi TV show series, this community continues to astound us.

Lately we’ve seen media broadcasters—both traditional and non-traditional—experimenting with video to share news and information right here on Instagram.

NowThis News (@nowthisnews) is among those leading the charge. The NowThisNews crew teamed up with Newark Mayor and U.S. Senate-candidate Cory Booker for an Instagram video interview series.

CNN (@CNN) recently launched a 15-second debates micro-site as part of its German elections coverage. The project asks German political parties to answer reporter questions in 15-seconds or less to be shared on Instagram.

For #NPRDumplingWeek, NPR (@NPR) teamed up with chefs to post fun, instructional videos to teach their community how to make Shumai, Manti, Tortellini, and Potstickers.

CBS This Morning (@CBSthismorning) has been using time-lapse to experiment with delivering followers 15-second newscasts, including this one documenting efforts to salvage a massive cruise ship.

We’re always excited to see new ways Instagrammers are using video and we’re excited to see what comes next.

nprradiopictures

nprradiopictures:

Growing up in Santa Barbara, Calif., photojournalist Dania Maxwell saw two different sides of life.

"I grew up, I feel, with a lot of privilege," she says. "I was given a house, a home, a family that I love."

But her mother, an immigrant from Argentina, wanted to show her that there was “another side” to her hometown.

They would spend time at Latino community centers — and Maxwell’s nanny was an illegal immigrant from El Salvador. Her mother, Maxwell says, “made me think critically about what was happening.”

"A lot of people around me immigrated to the U.S. because they wanted something better," she explains — mostly for their children. Maxwell’s mother provided her with opportunity but also curiosity, which has been the force behind her ongoing project about immigration and youth in America.

Blurring The Border To See Two Sides

Photo Credit: Dania Maxwell

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